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Big fish, that give you big action!

 

 

A typical day at Aylmer Lake is heading out on water so vast you will have no fishing pressure when you are fishing the Canadian North. Slamming big trout every cast, trying to reef up a monster laker, catching a seemingly endless supply of huge trout, concluding with a final picturesque setting of a your dry fly rushing down a set of rapids to a huge, waiting arctic grayling. Big fish, that give you big action – this is what sets Aylmer Lake apart from other Canadian fisheries. You must EXPERIENCE Aylmer Lake!

Canadian Trophy Lake Trout

Salvelinus namaycush

Record from the Lake: 58 lbs  
Average Size from the Lake: 10-40 Lbs
Aylmer Lake Trout have Arctic Char DNA from the ice age when Aylmer Lake was previously connected to the Arctic Ocean. The sizes landed for our Lake Trout average from 10-40 lbs. The record for this lake so far is 58 lbs! Our biologist predicts the next world record will be from Aylmer Lake. Are you ready?

Arctic Grayling

Thymallus arcticus

Average Size from the Lake: 1-5 lbs 
Arctic Grayling are a member of the whitefish family and fishing for them is assured to provide exciting action. They have a sail-like dorsal fin and are found at the mouth of cold northern rivers. Average weights range from 0.4 to 0.9 kg (1 to 2 lbs), but grayling over 2.2 kg (5 lbs) have been caught in the Northwest Territories. Dry flies such as Wulff, Adams and hairwing patterns are usually effective. Lures can include small spinners and spoons, size 0-1 Mepps and small rubber jigs.
The Arctic grayling has disappeared from many areas in North America, but remains a classic catch in the North. They mature and spawn at 4 or 5 years (a length of about 11 to 12 inches).

Build Success Using our Tackle and Techniques

beach fishing poles

When you venture this far north you're pretty much guaranteed to catch a lot of fish. That aside, there are factors that come into play which can make or break a good fishing experience. Whether you are guided from the lodge or choose to venture out on your own, you can bring gear and use techniques that will give you better success landing the monsters.

Fishing LureTackle

When you factor in time of year, water temps, weather, structure and species then you can get a pretty good idea where the fish are moving. Sound complicated? Not really. If you get an overall picture in your head of conditions you can make an educated guess if you are unguided. But testing the waters with the right lure will give you an instant reading of your theory.

Fly Fishing
Until recently, Northern Canada did not sit on most fly-fishermen's radar screens for exotic trips. In the last 10 years, much of that has changed. Many fly-fishermen are now in tune to the tremendous experience of fly-fishing for Lake Trout and more and more are discovering the pluses of Canada's other species. As an experience, Aylmer Lake provides for some of the best Fly fishing in the North. Here anglers can fly-fish for two different species in a wealth of differing habitat and situations. From crystal clear bays rivalling the finest salt water flats to rushing rivers resembling magnificent blue-ribbon trout water, Aylmer Lake is a fly-fisherman's paradise.

Catch and Release - Barbless Hook Policy
To ensure the success of this lake for many years to come, we implemented a "catch and release" policy when the lodge was opened in 1999. We will continue this policy in the future. Of course, we do make exceptions with those unforgettable and delicious shore lunch where guests will enjoy fish caught only hours - or minutes - before! For those wishing to immortalize a catch we will be happy to arrange a perma mount through a taxidermist.

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